Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Partners with Carnegie Science Center for 21+ Night to Explore ‘The Sounds of Science’

PITTSBURGH, July 23, 2014 – The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is teaming up with the Carnegie Science Center for a special adults-only evening, featuring symphonic sounds with a scientific twist. “The Sounds of Science” is the theme of the Science Center’s next 21+ Night on Friday, Aug. 1, from 6 – 10 pm.

Throughout the evening, musicians will demonstrate their instruments, including a double bass and a bassoon. They’ll even hook up instruments to the Science Center’s Rubens’ Tube, which visually demonstrates an instrument’s sound waves and pressure by shooting flames into the air.

Visitors can dance on a giant floor piano and play a tune with Boomwhackers, hollow percussion tubes. Stations throughout the building will offer the materials for DIY musical instruments, including a one-note harmonica. Guests can test their musical knowledge at a live action Trivial Pursuit game, complete with a prize giveaway. Visitors can pose with a Mozart-cut out – and enter to win a Mozart prize pack. Fiddlesticks, the orchestra’s “fiddlin’ feline” ambassador, will make a special appearance.

As always, 21+ Night features music, cash bars, and the chance to experience four floors of hands-on exhibits – with no kids!

Participants get a discount on Omnimax films and laser shows that evening. The cost of the event is just $10 with advance registration before noon on the day of the event or $15 after noon at the door. Guests will receive a voucher for $15 in free slot play at the Rivers Casino when they arrive, while supplies last.

21+ Nights are sponsored by Trib Total Media, and Bob and Q92 Radio.

For more information or to register, visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org or call 412.237.3400.

About Carnegie Science Center
Carnegie Science Center is dedicated to inspiring learning and curiosity by connecting science and technology with everyday life. By making science both relevant and fun, the Science Center’s goal is to increase science literacy in the region and motivate young people to seek careers in science and technology. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, the Science Center is Pittsburgh’s premier science exploration destination, reaching more than 700,000 people annually through its hands-on exhibits, camps, classes, and off-site education programs.

About Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh
Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1895, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh is a collection of four distinctive museums dedicated to exploration through art and science: Carnegie Museum of Art, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Science Center, and The Andy Warhol Museum. Annually, the museums reach more than 1.2 million people through exhibitions, educational programs, outreach activities, and special events.

About Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
For more than 116 years, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra has been an essential part of Pittsburgh’s cultural landscape. The Pittsburgh Symphony, known for its artistic excellence, is credited with a rich history of the world’s finest conductors and musicians, and a strong commitment to the Pittsburgh region and its citizens. This tradition was furthered in fall 2008, when Austrian conductor Manfred Honeck became music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. With a long and distinguished history of touring both domestically and overseas since 1900, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra continues to be critically acclaimed as one of the world’s greatest orchestras. The Pittsburgh Symphony has made 40 international tours, including 20 European tours, eight trips to the Far East, and two to South America. Under the baton of Gilbert Levine, the PSO was the first American orchestra to perform at the Vatican in January 2004 for the late Pope John Paul II, as part of the Pontiff’s Silver Jubilee celebration. The PSO has a long and illustrious history in the areas of recordings and radio concerts. As early as 1936, the PSO broadcast coast-to-coast, receiving increased national attention in 1982 through network radio broadcasts on Public Radio International (PRI). The PRI series is produced by Classical WQED-FM 89.3 in Pittsburgh and is made possible by the musicians of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

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Jul 23